19th August, 2014

iggyazazel asks:

How do I start volunteering?

smithsoniantranscriptioncenter:

Hey there IggyA -

Just come right to transcription.si.edu, then find a project

  • Using the Projects tab (top right) or
  • Click a picture in the carousel or
  • Click a link in the latest updates (bottom right) that other volunteers are transcribing

and transcribe! You’ll enter a captcha on each page when you have finished it.

OR you can sign up for an account and start!

Thanks for joining us and check in here and on Twitter (@TranscribeSI) for more tips! Feel free to tell us what you discover and what you think we can do to make transcription better.

P.S. One quick tip from our exisiting #volunpeers - try to do at least two pages before you give up! It takes a bit of time to get used to someone’s handwriting and style. 

(via welcome to the card catacombs)

18th August, 2014

(via Transformative Tidbits)

17th August, 2014

uwmspeccoll:

What’s in a banner? 

The images used in our banner are from the third edition of Owen Jones’s classic work “The Grammar of Ornament” (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1868). Jones, a designer and decorator primarily interested in the use of color in ornamental design (“form without colour is like a body without a soul”) was an early proponent of the use of chromolithography (“The Grammar of Ornament” was first published in 1856). The book presents hundreds of samples of color designs from across time, geography, and culture. Sample images from the book are presented here.

We chose images from this book for use in our banner because we believe they represent some of the core areas of documentation at UWM’s Special Collections: history, culture, art, design, and the history of books and printing. Of course, chromolithography is also Max’s favorite printing technology.
uwmspeccoll:

What’s in a banner? 

The images used in our banner are from the third edition of Owen Jones’s classic work “The Grammar of Ornament” (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1868). Jones, a designer and decorator primarily interested in the use of color in ornamental design (“form without colour is like a body without a soul”) was an early proponent of the use of chromolithography (“The Grammar of Ornament” was first published in 1856). The book presents hundreds of samples of color designs from across time, geography, and culture. Sample images from the book are presented here.

We chose images from this book for use in our banner because we believe they represent some of the core areas of documentation at UWM’s Special Collections: history, culture, art, design, and the history of books and printing. Of course, chromolithography is also Max’s favorite printing technology.
uwmspeccoll:

What’s in a banner? 

The images used in our banner are from the third edition of Owen Jones’s classic work “The Grammar of Ornament” (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1868). Jones, a designer and decorator primarily interested in the use of color in ornamental design (“form without colour is like a body without a soul”) was an early proponent of the use of chromolithography (“The Grammar of Ornament” was first published in 1856). The book presents hundreds of samples of color designs from across time, geography, and culture. Sample images from the book are presented here.

We chose images from this book for use in our banner because we believe they represent some of the core areas of documentation at UWM’s Special Collections: history, culture, art, design, and the history of books and printing. Of course, chromolithography is also Max’s favorite printing technology.
uwmspeccoll:

What’s in a banner? 

The images used in our banner are from the third edition of Owen Jones’s classic work “The Grammar of Ornament” (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1868). Jones, a designer and decorator primarily interested in the use of color in ornamental design (“form without colour is like a body without a soul”) was an early proponent of the use of chromolithography (“The Grammar of Ornament” was first published in 1856). The book presents hundreds of samples of color designs from across time, geography, and culture. Sample images from the book are presented here.

We chose images from this book for use in our banner because we believe they represent some of the core areas of documentation at UWM’s Special Collections: history, culture, art, design, and the history of books and printing. Of course, chromolithography is also Max’s favorite printing technology.
uwmspeccoll:

What’s in a banner? 

The images used in our banner are from the third edition of Owen Jones’s classic work “The Grammar of Ornament” (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1868). Jones, a designer and decorator primarily interested in the use of color in ornamental design (“form without colour is like a body without a soul”) was an early proponent of the use of chromolithography (“The Grammar of Ornament” was first published in 1856). The book presents hundreds of samples of color designs from across time, geography, and culture. Sample images from the book are presented here.

We chose images from this book for use in our banner because we believe they represent some of the core areas of documentation at UWM’s Special Collections: history, culture, art, design, and the history of books and printing. Of course, chromolithography is also Max’s favorite printing technology.
uwmspeccoll:

What’s in a banner? 

The images used in our banner are from the third edition of Owen Jones’s classic work “The Grammar of Ornament” (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1868). Jones, a designer and decorator primarily interested in the use of color in ornamental design (“form without colour is like a body without a soul”) was an early proponent of the use of chromolithography (“The Grammar of Ornament” was first published in 1856). The book presents hundreds of samples of color designs from across time, geography, and culture. Sample images from the book are presented here.

We chose images from this book for use in our banner because we believe they represent some of the core areas of documentation at UWM’s Special Collections: history, culture, art, design, and the history of books and printing. Of course, chromolithography is also Max’s favorite printing technology.
uwmspeccoll:

What’s in a banner? 

The images used in our banner are from the third edition of Owen Jones’s classic work “The Grammar of Ornament” (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1868). Jones, a designer and decorator primarily interested in the use of color in ornamental design (“form without colour is like a body without a soul”) was an early proponent of the use of chromolithography (“The Grammar of Ornament” was first published in 1856). The book presents hundreds of samples of color designs from across time, geography, and culture. Sample images from the book are presented here.

We chose images from this book for use in our banner because we believe they represent some of the core areas of documentation at UWM’s Special Collections: history, culture, art, design, and the history of books and printing. Of course, chromolithography is also Max’s favorite printing technology.
uwmspeccoll:

What’s in a banner? 

The images used in our banner are from the third edition of Owen Jones’s classic work “The Grammar of Ornament” (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1868). Jones, a designer and decorator primarily interested in the use of color in ornamental design (“form without colour is like a body without a soul”) was an early proponent of the use of chromolithography (“The Grammar of Ornament” was first published in 1856). The book presents hundreds of samples of color designs from across time, geography, and culture. Sample images from the book are presented here.

We chose images from this book for use in our banner because we believe they represent some of the core areas of documentation at UWM’s Special Collections: history, culture, art, design, and the history of books and printing. Of course, chromolithography is also Max’s favorite printing technology.
uwmspeccoll:

What’s in a banner? 

The images used in our banner are from the third edition of Owen Jones’s classic work “The Grammar of Ornament” (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1868). Jones, a designer and decorator primarily interested in the use of color in ornamental design (“form without colour is like a body without a soul”) was an early proponent of the use of chromolithography (“The Grammar of Ornament” was first published in 1856). The book presents hundreds of samples of color designs from across time, geography, and culture. Sample images from the book are presented here.

We chose images from this book for use in our banner because we believe they represent some of the core areas of documentation at UWM’s Special Collections: history, culture, art, design, and the history of books and printing. Of course, chromolithography is also Max’s favorite printing technology.

uwmspeccoll:

What’s in a banner? 
The images used in our banner are from the third edition of Owen Jones’s classic work “The Grammar of Ornament” (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1868). Jones, a designer and decorator primarily interested in the use of color in ornamental design (“form without colour is like a body without a soul”) was an early proponent of the use of chromolithography (“The Grammar of Ornament” was first published in 1856). The book presents hundreds of samples of color designs from across time, geography, and culture. Sample images from the book are presented here.
We chose images from this book for use in our banner because we believe they represent some of the core areas of documentation at UWM’s Special Collections: history, culture, art, design, and the history of books and printing. Of course, chromolithography is also Max’s favorite printing technology.

(via UWM Special Collections)

16th August, 2014

(via Pitt Special Collections)

16th August, 2014

timekiller-s:

tonightsbroadcast:

I spent the greatest afternoon at the University of Maryland’s Radio Broadcast Archives today!  Michael Henry, Research Specialist in the Mass Media and Culture Collection gave us a tour of the broadcast library and special collections, and provided an incredible amount of information on the history, formats, and stars of old time radio.  Above are a few photos I snapped during the tour - and Mr. Henry was so kind to pull out some Jack Benny outtake stills of a photo shoot from Radio Times.  I’ve worked with digitizing video/audio collections in the past, but had never seen anything as extensive as UMD’s holdings: they had thousands of photographs, books, radio scripts, and audio recordings in every media imaginable (and some even unimaginable- wire recordings, for example).  in addition to radio, their collection contains such a huge wealth of material on television, the history of humor, magazine serials, memorabilia, biographies, etc. etc.  Their catalogue is available to view online, and if anyone interested in broadcast history is near the Maryland/DC area - I couldn’t give a stronger recommendation to visit these archives.  A big thank you again to UMD, if you’re not already following them on Tumblr, make sure to do so!
(Also:  If you’re wondering about the Mae West photo and her ban from the radio waves… see the next post!)

OMG I WANT TO VISIT!


My office was on this floor! Jim, I hope you see this. timekiller-s:

tonightsbroadcast:

I spent the greatest afternoon at the University of Maryland’s Radio Broadcast Archives today!  Michael Henry, Research Specialist in the Mass Media and Culture Collection gave us a tour of the broadcast library and special collections, and provided an incredible amount of information on the history, formats, and stars of old time radio.  Above are a few photos I snapped during the tour - and Mr. Henry was so kind to pull out some Jack Benny outtake stills of a photo shoot from Radio Times.  I’ve worked with digitizing video/audio collections in the past, but had never seen anything as extensive as UMD’s holdings: they had thousands of photographs, books, radio scripts, and audio recordings in every media imaginable (and some even unimaginable- wire recordings, for example).  in addition to radio, their collection contains such a huge wealth of material on television, the history of humor, magazine serials, memorabilia, biographies, etc. etc.  Their catalogue is available to view online, and if anyone interested in broadcast history is near the Maryland/DC area - I couldn’t give a stronger recommendation to visit these archives.  A big thank you again to UMD, if you’re not already following them on Tumblr, make sure to do so!
(Also:  If you’re wondering about the Mae West photo and her ban from the radio waves… see the next post!)

OMG I WANT TO VISIT!


My office was on this floor! Jim, I hope you see this. timekiller-s:

tonightsbroadcast:

I spent the greatest afternoon at the University of Maryland’s Radio Broadcast Archives today!  Michael Henry, Research Specialist in the Mass Media and Culture Collection gave us a tour of the broadcast library and special collections, and provided an incredible amount of information on the history, formats, and stars of old time radio.  Above are a few photos I snapped during the tour - and Mr. Henry was so kind to pull out some Jack Benny outtake stills of a photo shoot from Radio Times.  I’ve worked with digitizing video/audio collections in the past, but had never seen anything as extensive as UMD’s holdings: they had thousands of photographs, books, radio scripts, and audio recordings in every media imaginable (and some even unimaginable- wire recordings, for example).  in addition to radio, their collection contains such a huge wealth of material on television, the history of humor, magazine serials, memorabilia, biographies, etc. etc.  Their catalogue is available to view online, and if anyone interested in broadcast history is near the Maryland/DC area - I couldn’t give a stronger recommendation to visit these archives.  A big thank you again to UMD, if you’re not already following them on Tumblr, make sure to do so!
(Also:  If you’re wondering about the Mae West photo and her ban from the radio waves… see the next post!)

OMG I WANT TO VISIT!


My office was on this floor! Jim, I hope you see this. timekiller-s:

tonightsbroadcast:

I spent the greatest afternoon at the University of Maryland’s Radio Broadcast Archives today!  Michael Henry, Research Specialist in the Mass Media and Culture Collection gave us a tour of the broadcast library and special collections, and provided an incredible amount of information on the history, formats, and stars of old time radio.  Above are a few photos I snapped during the tour - and Mr. Henry was so kind to pull out some Jack Benny outtake stills of a photo shoot from Radio Times.  I’ve worked with digitizing video/audio collections in the past, but had never seen anything as extensive as UMD’s holdings: they had thousands of photographs, books, radio scripts, and audio recordings in every media imaginable (and some even unimaginable- wire recordings, for example).  in addition to radio, their collection contains such a huge wealth of material on television, the history of humor, magazine serials, memorabilia, biographies, etc. etc.  Their catalogue is available to view online, and if anyone interested in broadcast history is near the Maryland/DC area - I couldn’t give a stronger recommendation to visit these archives.  A big thank you again to UMD, if you’re not already following them on Tumblr, make sure to do so!
(Also:  If you’re wondering about the Mae West photo and her ban from the radio waves… see the next post!)

OMG I WANT TO VISIT!


My office was on this floor! Jim, I hope you see this. timekiller-s:

tonightsbroadcast:

I spent the greatest afternoon at the University of Maryland’s Radio Broadcast Archives today!  Michael Henry, Research Specialist in the Mass Media and Culture Collection gave us a tour of the broadcast library and special collections, and provided an incredible amount of information on the history, formats, and stars of old time radio.  Above are a few photos I snapped during the tour - and Mr. Henry was so kind to pull out some Jack Benny outtake stills of a photo shoot from Radio Times.  I’ve worked with digitizing video/audio collections in the past, but had never seen anything as extensive as UMD’s holdings: they had thousands of photographs, books, radio scripts, and audio recordings in every media imaginable (and some even unimaginable- wire recordings, for example).  in addition to radio, their collection contains such a huge wealth of material on television, the history of humor, magazine serials, memorabilia, biographies, etc. etc.  Their catalogue is available to view online, and if anyone interested in broadcast history is near the Maryland/DC area - I couldn’t give a stronger recommendation to visit these archives.  A big thank you again to UMD, if you’re not already following them on Tumblr, make sure to do so!
(Also:  If you’re wondering about the Mae West photo and her ban from the radio waves… see the next post!)

OMG I WANT TO VISIT!


My office was on this floor! Jim, I hope you see this. timekiller-s:

tonightsbroadcast:

I spent the greatest afternoon at the University of Maryland’s Radio Broadcast Archives today!  Michael Henry, Research Specialist in the Mass Media and Culture Collection gave us a tour of the broadcast library and special collections, and provided an incredible amount of information on the history, formats, and stars of old time radio.  Above are a few photos I snapped during the tour - and Mr. Henry was so kind to pull out some Jack Benny outtake stills of a photo shoot from Radio Times.  I’ve worked with digitizing video/audio collections in the past, but had never seen anything as extensive as UMD’s holdings: they had thousands of photographs, books, radio scripts, and audio recordings in every media imaginable (and some even unimaginable- wire recordings, for example).  in addition to radio, their collection contains such a huge wealth of material on television, the history of humor, magazine serials, memorabilia, biographies, etc. etc.  Their catalogue is available to view online, and if anyone interested in broadcast history is near the Maryland/DC area - I couldn’t give a stronger recommendation to visit these archives.  A big thank you again to UMD, if you’re not already following them on Tumblr, make sure to do so!
(Also:  If you’re wondering about the Mae West photo and her ban from the radio waves… see the next post!)

OMG I WANT TO VISIT!


My office was on this floor! Jim, I hope you see this. timekiller-s:

tonightsbroadcast:

I spent the greatest afternoon at the University of Maryland’s Radio Broadcast Archives today!  Michael Henry, Research Specialist in the Mass Media and Culture Collection gave us a tour of the broadcast library and special collections, and provided an incredible amount of information on the history, formats, and stars of old time radio.  Above are a few photos I snapped during the tour - and Mr. Henry was so kind to pull out some Jack Benny outtake stills of a photo shoot from Radio Times.  I’ve worked with digitizing video/audio collections in the past, but had never seen anything as extensive as UMD’s holdings: they had thousands of photographs, books, radio scripts, and audio recordings in every media imaginable (and some even unimaginable- wire recordings, for example).  in addition to radio, their collection contains such a huge wealth of material on television, the history of humor, magazine serials, memorabilia, biographies, etc. etc.  Their catalogue is available to view online, and if anyone interested in broadcast history is near the Maryland/DC area - I couldn’t give a stronger recommendation to visit these archives.  A big thank you again to UMD, if you’re not already following them on Tumblr, make sure to do so!
(Also:  If you’re wondering about the Mae West photo and her ban from the radio waves… see the next post!)

OMG I WANT TO VISIT!


My office was on this floor! Jim, I hope you see this.

timekiller-s:

tonightsbroadcast:

I spent the greatest afternoon at the University of Maryland’s Radio Broadcast Archives today!  Michael Henry, Research Specialist in the Mass Media and Culture Collection gave us a tour of the broadcast library and special collections, and provided an incredible amount of information on the history, formats, and stars of old time radio.  Above are a few photos I snapped during the tour - and Mr. Henry was so kind to pull out some Jack Benny outtake stills of a photo shoot from Radio Times.  I’ve worked with digitizing video/audio collections in the past, but had never seen anything as extensive as UMD’s holdings: they had thousands of photographs, books, radio scripts, and audio recordings in every media imaginable (and some even unimaginable- wire recordings, for example).  in addition to radio, their collection contains such a huge wealth of material on television, the history of humor, magazine serials, memorabilia, biographies, etc. etc.  Their catalogue is available to view online, and if anyone interested in broadcast history is near the Maryland/DC area - I couldn’t give a stronger recommendation to visit these archives.  A big thank you again to UMD, if you’re not already following them on Tumblr, make sure to do so!

(Also:  If you’re wondering about the Mae West photo and her ban from the radio waves… see the next post!)

OMG I WANT TO VISIT!

My office was on this floor! Jim, I hope you see this.

(via peripatetic dilettante)

15th August, 2014

wilsonlibunc:

"O Captain! my Captain!" 
Wilson Library staff members take a moment to honor Robin Williams’s life and to remember his time in the Grand Reading Room, during the filming of Patch Adams.  
Image Two: The Filming of the Motion Picture Patch Adams, 2 June 1998, in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library Photographic Services Photographs #P0087, North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives.
wilsonlibunc:

"O Captain! my Captain!" 
Wilson Library staff members take a moment to honor Robin Williams’s life and to remember his time in the Grand Reading Room, during the filming of Patch Adams.  
Image Two: The Filming of the Motion Picture Patch Adams, 2 June 1998, in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library Photographic Services Photographs #P0087, North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives.

wilsonlibunc:

"O Captain! my Captain!" 

Wilson Library staff members take a moment to honor Robin Williams’s life and to remember his time in the Grand Reading Room, during the filming of Patch Adams.  

Image Two: The Filming of the Motion Picture Patch Adams, 2 June 1998, in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library Photographic Services Photographs #P0087, North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives.

(via The Conversation Starts Here...)